Friday, January 12, 2007

The Diversity of Press Coverage

NPR: The march is being seen as a symbol of two distinct communities coming together to oppose Mayor Ray Nagin's assertion that the recent crime wave is mostly "black on black" attacks between drug dealers — and therefore not a direct threat to the city's larger community.

The Associated Press: Residents young and old, black and white, marched in the thousands on City Hall _ unified in their anger and demanding action be taken to stem violent crime that has claimed nine lives this year and left many contemplating their future in this hurricane-ravaged city.

The Los Angeles Times: The racially mixed processions started in various neighborhoods in the city. The biggest group congregated at the foot of Canal Street, a main thoroughfare, and marched just over a mile to City Hall, escorted by mounted police and other officers riding motorcycles.

The New York Times: Thousands of residents here, mostly whites, marched through downtown on Thursday in a show of anger over recent killings and local officials’ ineffective response...Yet it also showed the community’s deep division. Nearly all the demonstrators were white...The monochrome crowd was a surprise to many, and an unpromising augury for any possible resolution of the city’s crime crisis...one of Thursday’s few black demonstrators, Isadell Icastle, said: “I was totally shocked when I came here, that they didn’t have more black people out here.”

I guess the Times got there late.

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